Jorja Smith: Lost & Found

Jorja Smith: Lost & Found

Jorja Smith's debut album here and it's a must-listen.

Jorja Smith: Lost & Found

Jorja Smith's debut album here and it's a must-listen.

Jorja Smith has a level of grace and confidence many twice her age lack. The 20-year-old UK singer is one of the most promising young female R&B stars and explores young love on her debut LP Lost & Found. The title track is a strong intro and sets the tone for the rest of the album, all while reminding me of an early 2000s neo-soul song in the best way. Jorja sings about being in a place of confusion with her lover, wanting to be with him although they are in different places in their lives. It’s ironic because you can be so sure of yourself but question everything when you find someone going down a different path. The cycle of losing and finding is a common theme on this record.

In “Teenage Fantasy,” released as a single last year, Jorja sings again about someone that she knows she shouldn’t be with. Infatuation is something every teenager experiences and Jorja is no stranger to it. The lyrics are simple, but it makes sense considering Jorja wrote it when she was only 16 years old. Some teens have a better understanding of their romantic situation than older people give them credit for.

“Where Did I Go?” is another single Jorja unveiled long before her album’s release. This time she sings about questioning where she went wrong in the relationship after a breakup. It’s not one of the stronger records but certainly not a bad one.

On “February 3rd, ,” Smith finds herself having deeper feelings for her guy than he seems to reciprocate. “On My Own” is another gem. “Wondering Romance” has one of the most powerful choruses we’ve heard from Jorja and easily one of the album’s best tracks.

“Blue Lights” is the first single Jorja ever released and yet it’s the track I keep replaying the most. This is the type of song that epitomizes her ability as a songwriter. In an interview with Beats1, Jorja explains that she wrote the song after finding a knife in her friend’s bag and imagined what would’ve happened if he did something with the knife and needed his friend to cover it up. It’s amazing that great music come from situations that might seem insignificant to the average person.

Jorja finds herself spitting on “Lifeboats (Freestyle)”. How often is it that we find ourselves drowning when we could have easily helped them or how often do we see others drowning when we could have been their lifeboat? The smooth acoustics of “Goodbye” show Jorja’s ability to shine on the simplest instrumentals. “Tomorrow” is another solid track that displays Jorja’s vocals. While “Don’t Watch Me Cry” isn’t bad by any means it would’ve been nice for her to close the album with a stronger track.

Having already worked with the two biggest rappers alive in Drake and Kendrick Lamar, listeners might be surprised that there are no features on this album. This go around Jorja wants to stand on the strength of her own abilities and there’s nothing wrong with that.