The Carters Rule the World: Everything is Love Review

The Carters Rule the World: Everything is Love

It’s the marriage roller coaster that we’ve all been watching from the sidelines for a few years now, one album at a time.

The Carters Rule the World: Everything is Love

It’s the marriage roller coaster that we’ve all been watching from the sidelines for a few years now, one album at a time.
The Carters
Everything is Love
7
“not their best, but like a glove, this album fits just right”

It’s the marriage roller coaster that we’ve all been watching from the sidelines for a few years now, one album at a time.

Over this past weekend, in pure Beyonce and Jay-Z fashion, Everything is Love was released completely unannounced, and it’s already sneaking onto everyone’s playlists. This time around, The Carters have come together and collaborated on what seems to be part of a trilogy of albums -- preceding Bey’s Lemonade and Hov’s 4:44. Everything is Love is the album that comes full circle, tending to themes of forgiveness, family, shade, success, fame, racial profiling, and a whole damn lot more.

It’s no secret that the couple has had problems in their marriage, and despite being impressively private on most of their personal lives, The Carters have let each other -- and the public -- know the lowdown through their music (with a few leaks here and there, like that one time in the elevator).

The real relationship update lies at the very end of Everything is Love. The track “LOVEHAPPY” highlights the ugly, the hurt, and the forgiveness, which foils the opening of the album “SUMMER,” a soulful funk love song that describes the fun beginnings of their relationship. Strategically placed, “LOVEHAPPY” gives the anticipated answers to everyone’s questions—where are Beyoncé and Jay-Z now? Where do they stand? Does Bey forgive her husband for his faults?

“BOSS” and “NICE” are all about Bey claiming her success and unapologetically talking about it. Bey makes money on equity and royalties alone. Her “great, great, grandchildren already rich,” and Bey and Jay could give “two fucks” on streaming numbers. They’re just that “nice.” But despite their success, the homage to Bey’s hometown Houston (713 is the area code) and tip off to Jay-Z’s Brooklyn keeps them grounded. As mentioned in the song “HEARDABOUTUS” Jay-Z raps that he and Bey “don’t really do famous.” But with everything they’ve gone through as a couple, they would be nowhere with their tight circle of “FRIENDS”. They’re not looking to make any new ones, but the crew that has stuck by them have taught them both a thing or two about loyalty. And for those who have not proved their loyalty -- plenty of Easter eggs hidden in lyrics throughout the album.

“BLACKEFFECT” stands alone as it speaks on hate, racial profiling, police brutality, and nods to victims of these acts. Though this song has nothing to do with their marriage chronicles, both are ambassadors against discriminatory acts, and always stood side by side on their moral stances.

Trapsoul, funk, and soul drip throughout this album, and any Bey and Jay-Z fan will not be disappointed in their musical collaborative production. Bey raps, Blue makes a cameo, and Jay-Z calls out the Grammys. The Carters settle the score, call out former friends, and monetize on their marriage. In Bey’s own words, “success can not be quantified,” and while the trilogy seems to wrap up with new life lessons and sure-to-be-chart-topping hits, the trilogy concludes with a convincing ending -- love, happy.

Overall, I am a satisfied fan and while not their best, like a glove, this album fits just right. The Carters are a staple and almost anything they touch turns gold or platinum. While anger and sorrow has sold in the past, so does love and nerve. This is not necessarily the best from either Bey or Jay-Z, but I can appreciate the experimental documentation of their lives laid out on this album. Everything is Love wasn’t meant to make millions, be the next radio hit, or make history per say. Music is the way The Carter’s speak out to the world and let their fans know what’s going on, how they’re feeling, and where they’re going. I predict this album will do very well off of fan’s curiosities alone, but the album gets a solid A-/B+ from me or 4 out of 5 stars. My favorites were “SUMMER” and “LOVEHAPPY” and everything in between was cool but nothing aggressively impressive. Yet still, with legends like them, they embody equity, and that’s something no one can touch.