When I Think of You In a Castle - Post Animal

When I Think of You In a Castle - Post Animal

Alternative Rock 'n' Roll Indie
Post Animal
When I Think of You In a Castle
8.2
Fluctuated, Non-linear & Wily

“It’s almost as if Post Animal drew names from a hat and did their best impression of Mass Appeal’s Rhythm Roulette, and crafted a song that encompassed each artist/band’s main characterization.”

Six long-haired, Chicago-based twenty-somethings are the physical being that is Post Animal. The neo-psychedelic band fittingly released its first full length LP, When I think of You In a Castle, on April 20th, 2018. Bursting onto the scene with tremendous talent, Post Animal has earned itself two major acts this summer at Shaky Knees and Bonnaroo. In the past, they’ve toured with Wavves, and J Roddy Walston and The Business. That being said, the band only consists of five members while on tour. Joe Keery (Steve Harrington from Stranger Things) is a contributor to the band and serves as lead vocalist on multiple songs, but is otherwise obligated to shoot Stranger Things.

“Everywhere All At Once” kicks off the LP with a deceptive, euphoric sound that transitions from an acoustic, repetitive riff, backed by faint rainfall, to climaxes of frantic organ playing, and concludes by reverting back to the guitar. However, this time, its hectic, piranha-like frenzy of frets seamlessly transitions into the second track, “Gelatin Mode.”

Fluctuated. Non-linear. Wily. These three adjectives could describe Post Animal’s style. In “Gelatin Mode,” the influences of Kevin Parker (Tame Impala), Nathan Williams’ Wavves, and Ozzy Osbourne are evident throughout the entire track. It’s almost as if Post Animal drew names from a hat and did their best impression of Mass Appeal’s Rhythm Roulette, and crafted a song that encompassed each artist/band’s main characterization. From raucous, 80s highway rock to wispy synth-pop, and rounded off with chanting lyrics reminiscent of 70s Black Sabbath, “Gelatin Mode” offers one of the hottest tracks on the entire LP: “You’re my gelatin mode, time to explode.”

Skipping to the depressingly playful fourth track, “Ralphie,” Post Animal takes us on coming-of-age journey where the protagonist has their love interest taken by someone else. “Cause I went to a party and I left my pretty baby with Ralphie / Baby and now I’m alone,” are the lyrics that sound ever-so-familiar to many audiences. The upbeat melody warrants some dancing and foot-tapping from each listener. However, listening to the high-pitched wails pleading for recognition makes this song both peppy and melodramatic. “Ralphie” sounds as if it could’ve been inspired by The Lemon Twigs’ “Do Hollywood,” as it is depressingly sing-songy and rosy. This song could easily be their number one hit, due to the overall pop-influenced sound.

“Dirtpicker,” the final track (besides the bonus track, “Susie”), is a metaphorical high-speed chase of a song. Opening with a surf rock beat, “Dirtpicker” explodes out of the gates in Zenyatta-like fashion, and has the endurance to keep the beat consistent throughout the entire song. The lyrics seem thrown in to add substance to the song, but for the most part, this is an instrumental jam session; one you’d most likely find on a Tony Hawk Pro Skater game. Close your eyes and you may have a flashback of that first kickflip you landed -- whether it actually happened or not.

When I Think of You In a Castle is easily a record that could be replayed throughout the summer, on repeat. With major festival appearances on the horizon, Post Animal has the potential to become a household name in the near future. Oozing promise with their camaraderie and talent, Post Animal’s debut full length LP will be greatly received by both indie, and mainstream listeners.